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Features

The 2nd Odoyevsky International Organ Competition

by admin, Features

The 2nd Odoyevsky International Organ Competition

Dear Ladies and Gentlemen, We have the pleasure of informing you that the 2nd Odoyevsky International Organ Competition will take place in Moscow from 19 to 27 November. The competition is named after V.F. Odoyevsky (1804-1869), a prominent Russian music critic, writer, philosopher and public figure, one of the founders of Russian musicology and lexicography, and the author of the first original Russian organ compositions; he contributed much to sharpen the interest of the Russian musical circles to organ and to J.S. Bach’s extraordinary personality. The contest consists of four rounds in which participants will play organs of different styles and epochs in five Moscow halls including the Organ Hall of Gnesins Russian Academy of Music where the historic Henry Jones organ (1871) is installed. The 2nd Odoyevsky International Organ Competition 19-27 November 2017, Moscow, 4 rounds, 5 instruments Participant ages-range: 17-33 Application deadline: October 10, 2017 http://gnesin-academy.ru/organ_competition Along with the traditional organ repertoire, the Competition programme includes 20th century compositions, as well as a number of the most notable organ works of Russian composers. The competition jury consists of famous international experts in the art of organ playing. Competition rules, programme requirements and organ specifications are included in the attached documentation file and placed on the website: http://gnesin-academy.ru/organ_competition Competition Documentation Best wishes, Organizing Committee of the 2nd Odoyevsky International Organ...

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A tour of some organs and harpsichords in Groningen and Kampen, Netherlands

by admin, Features

A tour of some organs and harpsichords in Groningen and Kampen, Netherlands

I have returned from a vacation to the Netherlands where I was able to hear and play some fantastic historic and modern organs and harpsichords. Here are some photos. Oude Kerk, Amsterdam. Main organ case is empty for repairs to the pipes. Oude Kerk, Amsterdam. Ahrend-Brunzema organ. Martinikerk, Groningen. Schnitger organ. Groningen, Martinikerk. Schnitger organ.     Neuwolda. Cornelis Bom harpsichord. Neuwolda. Cornelis Bom harpsichord. Neuwolda. Cornelis Bom harpsichord. Noordbroek. Schnitger organ. Kampen. Kampen. Great organ at Bovenkerk. Kampen. Second, modern organ at Bovenkerk. Sietze de Vries Kampen. Bovenkerk. Groningen. Residence organ. Groningen. Titus Crijnen harpsichord after...

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International Organ Competition 2017 in Wuppertal, Germany

by admin, Features

International Organ Competition 2017 in Wuppertal, Germany

English: Historische Stadthalle Wuppertal open their doors for the International Organ Competition between 24 and 27 August 2017. The designated instrument for the competition and ensuing concerts is the Sauer Organ in the internationally renowned Großer Saal of the Historische Stadthalle Wuppertal. Application deadline: 19 May 2017 Please find further information on the website: www.wuppertaler-musiksommer.de Deutsch: Vom 24. bis 27. August 2017 laden die Hochschule für Musik und Tanz Köln und die Historische Stadthalle Wuppertal zu einem Internationalen Orgelwettbewerb ein. Wettbewerbs- und Konzertinstrument ist die Sauer-Orgel im international gerühmten Großen Saal der Historischen Stadthalle Wuppertal. Bewerbungsschluss: 19. Mai 2017 Nähere Informationen unter: www.wuppertaler-musiksommer.de  ...

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8th International Organ Competition Musashino-Tokyo

by admin, Articles

8th International Organ Competition  Musashino-Tokyo

8th International Organ Competition Musashino-Tokyo Open to All Organists with No Age Limit For the First Prize Winner: JPY 1,200,000 Concerts in Japan CD release on NAXOS with worldwide distribution Jury: Guy BOVET, chair Hans-Ola ERICSSON Francois ESPINASSE Bernhard HAAS HIROE Rie Susan LANDALE SHIN Dong-ill Audition Jury: KOBAYASHI Hideyuki Jürgen ESSL FASSANG László Venue: Musashino Civic Cultural Hall, Tokyo Organ: Marcussen & Søn (1984) Prospectus: http://www.musashino-culture.or.jp/iocm/pdf/8_prospectus_en.pdf Application Form: http://www.musashino-culture.or.jp/iocm/pdf/8_application_form_en.pdf The deadline of the application is 20 January 2017 (postmark) Secretariat 8th International Organ Competition Musashino-Tokyo c/o Musashino Shimin Bunka Kaikan 3-9-11 Naka-cho, Musashino, Tokyo 180-0006 JAPAN Tel: +81-(0)422-54-8822 Fax: +81-(0)422-54-2014 www.musashino-culture.or.jp/iocm e-mail:...

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Ground-breaking retrofit stepper system for pipe organs

by Maggie Pemberton, Articles

Ground-breaking retrofit stepper system for pipe organs

News from Maggie Pemberton in Munich Dear Club Members, This time I would like to tell you about a ground-breaking retrofit stepper system which has only just hit the market.  It is a registered Utility Model and has been developed by Munich-based Burkhard Fischer of “fionic GmbH, Ingenieurbüro für Softwareentwicklung”.  Burkhard Fischer is an organ-player and engineer in one – but modestly declines to be regarded as a kind of “organists’ Einstein”. One of the most striking aspects of the fionic system is the fact that it is external.  Everything can be prepared with great ease and at lightning speed with a few simple mouse clicks on a small laptop or “notebook”.  Another handy feature is that there is a menu in which you can store your combinations alphabetically (e.g. by composer), numerically (e.g. by BWV number) or even by recital date or type of church service. Installation, carried out by Burkhard Fischer personally, is unobtrusive.  There are only some cables at the back of the console; the couple of new pistons/toe pistons go virtually unnoticed and the only other thing you see is the laptop itself, which is normally placed somewhere on the console near the music desk, and which can be disconnected and locked away after use. The dimensions of this new invention can be more readily grasped when you consider the rather unwieldy five-manual console of the Theatinerkirche here in Munich, which basically has just the typical three rows of “free combinations” on offer.  This is obviously enough to accompany a Mass, but clearly presents a concert organist with severe limitations. Exterior of the Theatinerkirche. To the left and in the background, the green domes on the west towers of the Cathedral or “Frauenkirche” Interior of the Theatinerkirche (length 72.5m, width 15.5m, height 28.55m). The pipes of the Schuster organ are concealed in a high chamber opposite the pulpit Closer view of the high altar and east end. Most of the Eisenbarth ranks are underneath the visible pipes behind the altar Pedals of the Theatinerkirche console. Bottom row left are the 5 new toe pistons for the free combinations, plus an extra + stepper piston to the left of the crescendo roller. Bottom row right are the +/- steppers and the canceller (0) Console of the Theatinerkirche with the laptop at top right. Some new pistons can be seen under the dial on the left side of the music desk St. Rupert Ingolstadt       One of the most hair-raising hazards in the Theatinerkirche is the fact that several rows of vital couplers etc. are located effectively out of sight behind the music desk.  Once you’ve put up a Bach album or the gigantic RC hymnbook (measuring approx. 30x23x5 cm when closed and weighing in at over 2 kilos) you have no chance whatsoever of checking – let alone spontaneously altering – what’s going on there. When playing at this console you have to swivel your head wildly from left to right, run your eyes up and down extensive arrays of knobs, scan across all the thumb pistons and squint down around your feet if you suddenly feel the urge to check which ranks and couplers you’ve actually drawn while in the middle of a hymn.  This is exceedingly difficult.  Especially if you are simultaneously trying to keep one eye on the tiny monitor (located during Mass on the top left of the console) focused on the priest, and the other eye on the capricious bulky gadget designed for the organist to indicate the hymn and verse numbers for the congregation in the nave (located...

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Carol Williams Eastern Europe Tour 2004

by Carol Williams, Essays

Carol Williams Eastern Europe Tour 2004

Carol Williams Toccata “Suite Gothique”, Op. 25 (Léon Boëllmann) (MP3)  Copyright 2001 Melcot Music I am the Civic Organist of San Diego and I spend all my time performing concerts — either in San Diego or around the USA and abroad. I love to travel and feel it is a vital part of my exisitence as it keeps me on my toes! Going to a new country and savoring a different organ and acoustics is fascinating. In 2004, I had two visits to the UK, a trip to Canada, Germany, Poland and Czech Republic. My visit to Poland and Prague were extremely fascinating and I have highlighted some of the moments I spent on this wonderful tour. I flew from San Diego early on August 9th and arrived in Prague, the “City of One Hundred Spires”, the next morning. After being met at the airport by Irena Chribkova, the organist of St. James Basilica, I was given the hospitality of the quarters of the Basilica, located close to Prague’s “Old Town Square”. At night, one could hear the chimes of the 1410 Town Hall Horologe. On another night, a dramatic thunderstorm highlighted the historic skyline of this, one of Europe’s most beautiful cities, and I recommend a visit if you ever have the opportunity. The oldest organ in St. James’ dates from the beginning of the 18th century following a major fire at the church in 1689. The present instrument, reconstructed by Rieger-Kloss, is extremely powerful and magical acoustics enhance the listening experience. The stunning 1705 case is one of the most beautiful I have ever seen in my travels. Major work by Rieger-Kloss was done between 1981-82 including restoring the specification of the early work of Abraham Stark in 1705. The present instrument has four manuals with ninety-one speaking stops. There is also a small choir organ of mechanical action with slider chests in the gallery to the right of the chancel but the builder is unknown yet, its pipes show numerous similarities with the large organ at the rear of the church. I did not use this instrument in my concert, but I really enjoyed playing it. My concert was part of the 9th International Organ Festival and this year was in honor of Petr Eben who celebrated his 75th birthday on 22nd January. In the program, I included the moving Requiem from his Faust For Organ composed in 1976. The concert was sponsored by the American Embassy and the U.S. Ambassador to Czech Republic was in attendance. The concert was recorded for later broadcast by Prague Radio — I truly relished the opportunity to present a program on this magnificent organ. Following Prague, I flew via Vienna and Kraków to start a concert tour of southern Poland. The first was at the Monastery in the historic town of Jedrzejow. The Monastery dates from 1210 with the present organ being constructed between 1745-54 in the workshop of Polish organ builder Józef Sitarski. The instrument has four manuals, the fourth being a “pull-out” beneath the lowest fixed manual. It’s sole purpose is to transpose — a most unusual feature. The stop knobs are actually cast bronze handles and the instrument’s entire mechanism has survived intact. The blue and gold screen is stupendous and is located on the western wall of the main isle of the church. The wood casing was executed in the monastery workshop with the ornamentation coming from the wood-carving workshop of the Kornecki family of Kraków. My concert was part of the International Festival of Organ and Chamber Music, initiated in 1993, and takes place every July and August. Staying...

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